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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the lon
evening i susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> gom: llll street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus,e what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surpri, home depot was the dow's standout., >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stoto markets resumedtsed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. th new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, t
report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by includi
and new jersey: another storm takes aim at the region, as sandy's recovery slogs on, and the hunt for fuel heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see n
: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for the coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow'sng big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will ba biga win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play isort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as good and the market views that as good news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff.so more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought intohe fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak.in >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it mi
slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when aderivave trading strateg
clarity on the impact of superstorm sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we try to guide where we believe we're going to be so we're confident with our forecasts. >> reporter: terry thank you so much. >> thanks ruben. >> tom: while many wal-mart employees spent black friday working the check-out line, others were manning the picket line. they used the high profile shopping day to protest low wages, work schedules and employee benefits. the protests were organized by a union-backed employee group called "our walmart". demonstrations were
drugs, which come with higher margins. the company said hurricane sandy will hit fourth quarter earnings by about a penny per share. four of the five most actively traded e.t.f.s were higher, but the ipath s&p 500 exchange traded note was the weakest, down 3.5%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: in the storm-ravaged states of new york and new jersey, officials made sure everyone today would be able to vote. authorities let residents uprooted by hurricane sandy vote at any polling center in their states. in new jersey, some citizens were even allowed to cast ballots by email. as suzanne pratt reports, sandy's chaos didn't stop voters from getting to the polls. >> reporter: parsippany, new jersey, was hit hard by hurricane sandy. many homes still have no power, and many gas stations are still dry. nevertheless, residents made it their business to vote today, even though their polling site had to be moved at the last minute to a new location. >> reporter: in manhattan, only a handful of voting centers had to be changed because of the storm's aftermath. this site downtown is als
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the enomys faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is what
results don't even include the sales lift from superstorm sandy. home depot also raised its profit outlook for the year. if housing continues to improve, experts say it's a bullish sign for the rest of the economy. >> now, as we start to see residential investment recovery, that should help other sectors ofhe economy throu demd for building materials, through more demand for other products-- furniture, you name it! >> reporter: she's optimistic housing will remain one of the few bright spots in an otherwise sluggish recovery. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it was an unhappy earnings story in the third quarter for saks. the upscale department store said sales and profits were hurt by a modest spike in promotions. on top of that, saks expects sales to be flat in the current holiday period because of a slow start to november due to hurricane sandy. noow, trouble at saks underscores new worries spreading throughout the luxury sector about the all important holiday season. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: on manhattan's 5th avenue, it's beginning to look a lot like christmas. fr
slid 0.3% in october, more than expected, and the first decline in three months. hurricane sandy was behind at least some of the sales decline. but there are fresh worries today about the underlying strength of the american consumer. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: hurricane sandy is going to get blamed a lot in the coming weeks for soft economic data. and, rightfully so. after all the superstorm paralyzed a good chunk of the northeast for at least a week. that meant, no shopping, no eating out, and no filling up the tank. >> clearly, the retail sales data were weak and they were weak across a lot of categories. the commerce dept did talk about the affects on hurricane sandy on the numbers. but, it's hard to quantify. >> reporter: the question is whether that consumer paalysis will continue into the all important holiday retail season. many economists say that really depends on whether americans feel secure in the their jobs. here's the good news: there has recently been some improvement on the labor front. on top of that, many shoppers are finding their wallets are thicker n
spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)